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Warehouse 13 as a Museum #1

It’s no secret that one of my favorite television shows is Warehouse 13 (just read my first post, Wonder). It is smart, funny, has a heart, and often leads me down the history nerd rabbit hole. Warehouse 13 has an interesting way of presenting history — it does not always adhere to actual fact, but uses an empathetic fact and object lessons to help viewers feel the historical emotional truth that lies underneath.

Warehouse 13’s first episode starts off with an introduction to its two leads, Myka Bering (Joanne Kelly), and Pete Lattimer (Eddie McClintock), “coincidentally” inside a museum. They both work for the Secret Service, and are there to protect the President. I don’t want to spoil the whole story, but I will tell you that the events send the two agents to a new job — working for Warehouse 13.

The Warehouse is a repository of objects that have been effected by the historical people and events that they are connected to. From ancient history to modern history, from folklore to literary figures, if you like a period of history, it’s probably been mentioned in the series. Every object has been collected because it does something weird. From a chair that makes people act out their deepest (angry) desires to a teapot that puts people inside of video games, to a kettle that grants wishes (or creates ferrets), every object does something. Artie, the agent in charge of the Warehouse, describes it like this: imagine giving Thomas Jefferson a radio. What would he have done with it? Artie says that after studying it, Jefferson would have probably locked it away. This is what the Warehouse agents do: snag (collect artifacts), bag (diffuse them) and tag (basic accessions), the unofficial catchphrase of the series.

This leads to a few of my own wonderings about museums.

When we put objects inside of our museums, why are we putting them there? To protect them? To protect the story they tell? To retell their story? To share them with the public (obviously not what the Warehouse agents are doing)?

What do you think? What is the function of the museum in this day and age?

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Friday Finds (#4)!

Hello all! How has your week been in your museum?

One of our two exhibits, 1001 Inventions: Discover the Golden Age of Muslim Civilization, left this past Sunday. What a weekend we had! On Saturday we had 1,500 visitors, which meant our little museum was pretty packed! Since it left (and we only have one (ticketed) exhibit), we’ve had under 100 visitors each day. Talk about variability! We’ve found ways to keep entertained with trivia and counting games, which encourage us to pay attention to exhibit content. Let’s see what I’ve found this week:

1. When it Rains, it Pours
Have you ever noticed that on the days that museums get busy, they get really busy? Ours sure did! Questions of the same kind also seem to pile up — after a month of nobody asking me for a brochure, everyone wanted one! We also have a well-known speaker program through my organization, and our spring pamphlet just went out. Tonight’s wolf program sold out two weeks ago, but everyone wants a ticket now! I love how excited people are about our programs.

2. Autism in the Museum Blog
I am super excited about a blog I found this week: Autism in the Museum I really want to make our museum accessible for our autistic visitors and their families, and this looks like it will be a great resource.

3. Quiet Exhibit Fun!
It was very quiet in the museum Monday and Tuesday and we decided to learn more about the exhibit — we pcounted the number of screens (37) and stuffed birds (14) in our birds exhibit. It’s a super visual exhibit, and actually doesn’t have a lot of text. I like exhibits like it because they’re a little less visually exhausting (but I do miss having some text).

Got a favorite way your museum staff has fun when there are fewer visitors? Let me know in the comments!

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